Film Realism

     
 
This Movie Maker 2012 exercise teaches:
 


• How to adjust film clip exposure, brightness, contrast, and saturation levels
• How to use and layer sound
• How to create a plausibly “real” moment that never existed
• How much can be evoked within the limits of film “realism” 

 
( Movie Maker 2012 downloads free here if your Windows 7 or Windows 8 OS lacks this Windows Essentials software).

 
  1. Download this film clip to your computer.  
  2. Open Windows Movie Maker, create and save a new project. Title your new movie, "Film Realism."  
  3. Import the clip you downloaded, ‚"ModernTrain" into Windows Movie Maker by selecting the "Import Video" option under the task pane. Drag it to the video timeline on the bottom of the screen.  
  4. View the shot. The train appears to run in reverse. Right click the clip and choose Video Effects. Then highlight "mirror, horizontal" and click the "Add" button to make the train approach, not depart.  
  5. Right click the clip again. Choose "Copy,"navigate to the end of the first clip, right click again, and click "Paste" to duplicate the clip. This also copies our "mirror, horizontal" effect.
 
  6. Right click the second clip and choose "Copy." Navigate to the end of the second clip, right click again, and click "Paste" to duplicate the clip. We now have three clips of the train moving left to right.
 
  7. Right click the second clip and choose "Video Effects." On the left hand side in "Available Effects" highlight "brightness, decrease" and click "add" to darken the second clip.  
  5. Double click the third clip. In the clip inspector, choose Video->Brightness->45%->Done.
 
  6. From transitions, drag “Cross Dissolve” between the first and second shots. In the inspector, set “duration” at 1.0. Uncheck “Applies to all transitions.” Drag another “Cross Dissolve” between the second and third shots. Set duration at 1.0.  
  8. Right click the third clip and choose "Video Effects." On the left hand side in "Available Effects" highlight "brightness, decrease" and click "Add." Then click "Grayscale" and click "Add" again. This darkening and grayscale image suggests nighttime .  
  9. Under the tasks pane on the left hand side, under "Video Transitions" drag "Fade" between the first and second shots on the timeline. Drag another "Fade" between the second and third shots.  
  10. Right click the first shot and select "Fade In." Then right click the third shot and select "Fade Out."  
  Cool! You’re done. Your movie now runs one minute, slightly longer than a typical Lumière cinématographe film. Using a stationary shot not very different from L’Arriveé d’un train à La Ciotat, you created a “film” expressing the passage of time ticked off by the pendulum of passing trains.  
  Want to keep playing?  
  11. To add a music track (not available to Lumière era filmmakers), click on the import audio or music option under the tasks pane. Select a sound file from your own computer. Drag the audio clip to the Audio/Music track. The clip will most likely be longer than your video track, so hover over the end of the audio track until a red arrow appears. Trim your audio clip to match the duration of your video track. Right click and choose "fade in." Right click again and choose "fade out."  
  12. Want your train to move "homebound?" Right click the first clip and click "Video Effects." Under "Displayed Effects" select "mirror, horizontal" and click "remove." Repeat the process for the other two clips. (Objects moving from screen right to screen left seem somehow retrogressive). Play the movie to see how those transformations strikes you.  
  13. Export your movie to the universe by clicking "Save to my computer" under the tasks pane and follow the prompts.